Star Wars: The Old Republic Review

Star Wars: The Old Republic – Is It A Replacement?

Years and years ago I got my first computer at the ripe old age of nine. This ignited a fire in me that still seems to burn to this very day. My first tinkerings with the old Dell XPS (that lacked a dedicated GPU, even) were playing one of the first big MMOs – Star Wars Galaxies. Let it be well known that this game started my passion for technology that I still have today, so I’m pretty biased. I searched for years for a recreation, an alternative, a fix for my addiction after the game sadly shut down in late 2011. Little did I know that there was a backstory to the timeless game’s shut down. Star Wars: The Old Republic was set to release a year and a few days later after the shut down of SWG. I immediately purchased this game and set out to critic it, so here I am almost 3 full years later writing a review.

Let’s Talk Game Mechanics & Graphics

Gameplay mechanics are on par with any MMO I’ve ever played ranging from WoW to SWG. Button spam wins gunfights, certain abilities are overpowered, higher level mobs take far more of one attack than another, Area of Effect (AoE) attacks are devastating. These are mechanics that are shared by every single MMORPG out there and it didn’t impress me. Something that did impress me? The animations. The animations created an atmosphere of realism that made me feel like I was a Jedi Consular fighting the evil armies of the Sith on Tattooine or a Smuggler bringing my load of cargo from one star system to another. I understand that this seems trivial but for a nerd like myself, this made it worthwhile. I currently run an Intel i5 processor and an NVIDIA 970 graphics card, so frames stuck above 60 the entire time, however in a game like this you can play at thirty FPS and still experience it in its full glory.

What About Currencies?

This is a pretty big point for lots of people. There’s only so much I can tell you from my personal perspective, but I’ll give you a break down of how much it costs to be a subscriber, their currency called “Cartel Coins” and the in game Credit system.

Cost to Join

The game has a free to play mode but that’s borderline worthless. SW:TOR follows the typical game time model that most MMOs set. 60 days is $30 (non recurring), 30 days is $15.00/month, 90 days is $13.99/month and finally 180 days is $13.00/month. The subscriber perks are readily available on site and they, honestly, are completely worth it. Their currency is called “Cartel Coins” and can be used to purchase exclusive items that “credits” (in game currency) cannot purchase.

Cartel Coins cost $5.00 for 450, $10.00 for 1050, $20 for 2400, and $40 for 5500. 5500 should be more than enough if you’re a new comer, and your subscription comes with some already. The ones granted by your subscription will get your feet in the water, but I can’t stress this enough: you don’t need to buy anything from the Cartel Market at all. They’re optional. They enhance gameplay only a little bit, and at the end of the day you’re paying a massively rich company more money for a small little hologram at your side.

Conclusion

Basically, this game’s amazing. I enjoy it and I find it fun to play for hours on end. The game’s not a WoW clone or an Everquest clone – you may as well say that about every MMO if you’re going to say SW:TOR is. I completely and thoroughly enjoyed it and felt I got my money out of it. I recommend watching YouTube videos, playing in the free to play mode for a bit, and watching Twitch streams to get the feel for whether or not you truly want this game to be on your 2015 Christmas list.

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